How To Fix These 4 Bowhunting Mistakes Before They Happen

While negative thinking is usually a curse, it can serve a purpose when you look at these possible outcomes and come up with a plan to fix them before they happen. A nice, mature buck came through, but it was not one of the bucks I was after. Don’t overthink — get your bow drawn as soon as the deer gets within range, and when you see a shot you know you can make, take it. Rod hunted a giant buck for two years before it finally followed a doe straight toward his stand. So, he didn’t have a shooting lane where the buck walked. Both Larry and I could have avoided issues had we drawn our bows after loading our arrows and settling into the tree. Mid-Flight Deflections I have had three good animals get away because my arrow hit a branch above my line of sight. If there is anything between you and the animal, you need to stop and take a few extra seconds before shooting. For example, assume it is a 30-yard shot, but your 20-yard pin is right on a branch. Avoiding mistakes is not just luck.

No one likes a pessimist, but there are times when it pays to look for the dark clouds we hate to admit are there — to determine what can go wrong. While negative thinking is usually a curse, it can serve a purpose when you look at these possible outcomes and come up with a plan to fix them before they happen.

Looking for worst-case scenarios is a good plan for many outdoor activities, be it wilderness camping or bowhunting. These are unforgiving — you make one mistake, and the whole thing unravels faster than a cheap shirt in a patch of multiflora rose.

What-Can-Go-Wrong--BOWP-171000-BOW-01
Test draw your bow every time you settle into a treestand. This simple act can help you identify many issues that could affect your ability to pull off the shot.

I am going to zero in on things that can go wrong during the moment of truth. It would be nice if we could just leave this until the time it actually happens, but those encounters come with a lot of adrenaline and not much time — both push cerebral capacity well past its limit. I must rehearse every possible outcome, or I will most likely misplay my big opportunity. Here are four things that can go wrong and ways to avoid the tragic ending:

Paralysis By Analysis
I once had a friend come to film my hunt, and I encouraged him to bring his bow. A nice, mature buck came through, but it was not one of the bucks I was after. So, I swung the camera over, and my friend grabbed his bow. The buck was within 30 yards for at least a minute, but my friend never drew. Afterwards, I asked him why not. “He never offered me a shot,” Thad said.

I thought the buck offered him several shots, so I asked what he was looking for. As it turns out, Thad wanted something closer to the classic, broadside shot at 20 yards with the deer in the wide open and his head turned looking the other way.

I applaud the careful nature of my friend’s shot selection, but that buck got away because my friend overanalyzed the situation. You need to be ready for the first good shot you get; don’t wait for perfect when good enough is right in front of you.

Don’t overthink — get your bow drawn as soon as the deer gets within range, and when you see a shot you know you can make, take it.

No Shooting Lane
I have another friend with a lesson to teach. Rod hunted a giant buck for two years before it finally followed a doe straight toward his stand….

Tags from the story
Written By
More from Staff Writer
The Money Beam for Accurate Culling
The Money Beam. The Money Beam from Cal Coast Fishing assures accurate...
Read More
Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *