Blog

Do you get a lot of boxes in the Mail?

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Q: What can we do about ALL the individual shipping boxes that Amazon and other retailers send out? Recycling doesn’t seem like enough. My friends and neighbors order every little thing and it all comes in separate boxes.
It’s even sponsored by Amazon and some other retailers, including Overstock, Loft, REI, Levi’s, Asics, Ann Taylor, Uncommongoods, Bon-Ton, Viva Terra, Ecru, Bonobos, Scrubs & Beyond, eBags, Lou & Grey, and Cherry Mad.
You simply empty the box you got from Amazon, and then fill it with as much used clothing, accessories, and household stuff that you no longer need or want. Then go to https://givebackbox.com/ to download a U.S. Post Office or UPS address label to Goodwill for free. Attach the lablel to the box and drop it off at any post office or UPS service, which will send it to your nearest Goodwill outlet. Goodwill stores pay for the shipments, which they then put on the market.

Is Roundup so Bad?

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Her exhaustive examination of the history of glyphosate—the main ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup—reveals that a herbicide as common as laundry detergent is the health and environmental calamity of modern agriculture.
Monsanto rolled out its wonder weed killer in 1974, claiming the chemical was “safe as table salt.” With the introduction of “Roundup Ready” crops in 1996—soybean, corn, cotton, and canola genetically modified to be glyphosate-resistant—the use of Roundup rose dramatically, as farmers could apply it to entire fields without damaging their crops. “Testing shows glyphosate residues not only in bagels, honey, and oatmeal but also in eggs, cookies, flour, beer, infant formula,” Gillam writes. In one study in Indiana, the chemical was found in 90 percent of the pregnant women tested.
Gillam assembles independent research, internal Monsanto communications, and case studies of cancer victims into a comprehensive, disturbing report on the suspected health and environmental impacts of glyphosate exposure. Equally astonishing are the serial revelations of how Monsanto conscripted scientists, professors, and regulators to aid in its defense. The EPA emerges as the key accomplice here: For decades, the agency overlooked concerns that glyphosate was carcinogenic. (The World Health Organization announced in March 2015 that glyphosate was a probable human carcinogen.)
This is a story about what happens to public health and the environment when capitalism overthrows the social contract and the fever for profit poisons the heart against all morality.

“Deep Woods, Wild Waters”

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Toward the end of his latest book, Deep Woods, Wild Waters: A Memoir (University of Minnesota Press, 2017), Douglas Wood writes that his “has been a lucky life.” The humblebrag is a fair one: Wood is the author of the popular Old Turtle series (either children’s books or deep ecological cosmology, or both—take your pick) and a lifelong explorer of the rivers and lakes of the North Woods. Somehow, he managed to cobble together a living as an itinerant singer and writer and wilderness guide—good work, if you can get it.
From the first page, he is in an epistolary mode. This is no straightforward account of a life’s events, but a twisting current of memory, stories looping back and forth just like the glacier-carved maze of Wood’s beloved Voyageur’s Highway—the cold waters once navigated by the Ojibwe and, later, French trappers.
At times, the spiritual instruction is a bit much. But there’s a lot of humor here, too, like Wood’s hilarious celebration of the campfire coffeepot. His insights are honest and hard-earned. Story, he reminds us, “is creating a connection to another living being,” whether spouse or grandchild or spruce or loon.

Experiences Are What Matters

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I hunt deer each season but only until I kill a doe, and unlike my brothers, I don’t enjoy hunting deer from an elevated deck.
We ate lunch, and before leaving I toured the shack.
A few years later, Dad gave me a Remington 1100 20 gauge.
Lights coming from trucks, some parked and others moving around the structure, cast wild and rolling shadows across the faces of the men, some of whom I knew from church and others I’d never seen.
I climbed into the back of a truck with my dad and other hunters, and we headed out.
Neither Dad nor I ever hunted dogdriven deer again.
After the club’s demise, I hunted deer to spend time with my dad and brothers.
Usually, I get a doe quickly and am always thankful for a close, clean shot.
I wouldn’t hunt over dogs again, but I am thankful Dad shared that experience, which continues to shape my hunting expectations—even as I pass 50.
As I get older, I often do wish my siblings and I had been closer in age, that we could have shared life’s experiences when we were all relatively inexperienced.

Turn Your Passion into an Outdoor Career

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Katie, Arc’teryx: I’ve been a climber most of my life, but have always loved building things as well.
At the show, I had the opportunity to meet and network with a lot of brands in the industry and that helped me when I went home to start looking for jobs.
How do you find career opportunities in the outdoor industry? Do you have to move to the mountains to get an outdoor job?
Kami, Osprey Packs: Outdoor Industry Jobs is another great resource for all types of outdoor industry jobs, not specific to women.
Camber Outdoors: We’ve got a bunch of resources on our Career Center designed to help women make the shift into the outdoor industry.
What’s something you wish more people knew about working in the outdoor industry?
Brylee, Arc’teryx: Sew!

Six Wildlife Webcams for Fall

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With summer winding down, you might be trading your beach balls for boots, but nature’s action doesn’t have an off-season. Just click in, sit back, and watch nature unfold.
(Unfortunately, many table turkeys come from factory farms, so when shopping for yours this holiday season, look for labels advertising free-range or organic poultry.)
North American alligators take the cake for having the most forceful bite of any living animal, and can grow up to 15 feet long. You can watch these fearsome reptiles and their pink-feathered neighbors, the spoonbills, sunbathe and swim anytime. We recommend tuning in for daily feedings at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. PST.
Feeling nervous? Don’t worry—these hallmarks of Halloween much prefer gorging on horses and cows over humans, and don’t take enough blood to harm their hosts.
These fluffy predators weigh between two and three pounds, but with a wingspan of up to five feet, they’re North America’s largest species of owl.