Fishing

Blue Marlin Biology

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[A] Eyes: Proportionate to their body size, blue marlin have the largest eyes of any billfish species, comparable to the eyes of a swordfish.
[H] Brain: A huge optic center processes information from the eyes, giving blue marlin excellent vision.
They essentially see in black and white as they look down, but in shades of color as they look up toward the ocean’s surface.
Are there times and locations where large numbers of blue marlin are present but mostly feeding down near the thermocline?
For one thing, blue marlin have the biggest eyes in the billfish family, comparable to the enormous eyes of broadbill swordfish.
It’s interesting that some individuals make large-scale movements, while others might hang around a given area for extended periods of time.
Some blues circulate around the Western Pacific, and others between the Coral Sea off of northeastern Australia to the South Pacific islands.
We targeted school yellowfin, narrow-barred mackerel, and dogtooth tuna from 8 to 50 pounds for both live- and dead-rigged baits, and did not shy away from baits on the larger end of the scale.
We observed big marlin flashing in and attacking whole live tuna, open-mouthed, like predators without bills.
This means a blue marlin would see red as black, and various other colors as perhaps shades of gray.

Chica de Mayo Women’s Flyfishing Event Turns 10

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Each year in May, The River’s Edge and Simms Fishing Products host a women’s flyfishing event in Bozeman, MT—Chica de Mayo.
The gathering has evolved into the largest women’s flyfishing event in Montana, the United States, and well, probably in the world.
This year’s event celebrates women in flyfishing and offers educational clinics, phenomenal female speakers, prizes, a cocktail party, and much more.
It also marks the 10th Annual Chica de Mayo—a labor of love and a true milestone to celebrate.
Over the years guest speakers have presented on Kick Plastic, Aquatic Invasive Species, and other topics.
Throughout the day, merchandise sales and pink bucket raffles raise funds for Casting for Recovery – a non-profit organization offering breast cancer survivors a unique retreat program that combines breast cancer education and peer support with the therapeutic sport of flyfishing.
“From the 2017 event fundraising, a check for $5,000 was presented to Casting for Recovery—double the amount raised in 2016,” said Simms’ Diane Bristol.
“Between this and the continued growth in participation, it indicates that women are not only excited to potentially win an amazing prize, but that they also really want to support other women in flyfishing.” The River’s Edge and Simms Fishing are inviting all women anglers, near and far, to attend this year’s Chica de Mayo.
As the date draws closer, a team of incredible lady anglers are highly motivated to make this year an epic celebration.
Watch The River’s Edge and Simms Fishing Products Instagram and Facebook feeds for updates and to plan your trip to Bozeman to help us celebrate ten years.

Striper Migration Map March 30 2018

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2018 Striper Migration Map The striper migration has begun!
Striped bass are moving toward spawning grounds in Chesapeake Bay tributaries, and smaller stripers are getting active in warming inshore areas in Delaware Bay, along the New Jersey beaches, in the backwaters at the west end of Long Island, and in tidal rivers in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.
Follow along as we track the Striper Migration.
Chesapeake Bay Striper Report On the upper Chesapeake, the water temperature in the Susquehanna Flats has been holding about 45 degrees and rising slowly.
Note that beginning on April 1, the striped bass season is closed on spawning grounds.
Grumpy’s Tackle in Seaside Park reported that small plugs, shads, and bloodworms are all working in the backwaters.
New York Striper Report Backwater areas on the West End of the island were holding some schoolie stripers, and the fish have been a little more active thanks to warming water temperatures.
In Brooklyn at Bernie’s Bait and Tackle, they said anglers are starting to target schoolie striped bass in the area.
In Wantagh at Causeway Bait & Tackle, they reported anglers having great success with schoolie striped bass in the back bays.
Connecticut/Rhode Island Striper Report The holdover striper fishing has been good in the Housatonic River and in Connecticut RIver tributaries, and the fish will only get more active once the water begins to warm.

INDUSTRY NEWS | FISHING

Easy Illumination for Your Livewell

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Live bait is the life blood of many fishing trips, and a number of those trips start before daylight.
That’s why most livewells now feature illumination so you can see how your liveys are faring.
A light also helps keep the bait from bumping into the walls of the well.
But what happens when the light malfunctions?
First thing, turn it off, because a corroded connection or loose terminal can lead to an overheated wire and a possible fire.
To illuminate the livewell in the meantime, carry a handful of Cyalume 6-inch chemical light sticks (about $0.40 per stick in bulk).
It floats and casts a soft glow into the water.
Blue is the preferred color for livewell lights, but any color you have on board will work in a pinch.
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One Deck Brush Two Bristles

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In the past, I used two deck brushes when scrubbing the boat with soap and water after a day of fishing.
A brush with soft bristles covered 95 percent of the boat, but I had a stiff-bristle brush standing by for stubborn spots of dried blood and tracked-in dirt on the deck.
Today I use only one brush — the Combo Deck Brush from Shurhold (about $34).
A ring of long, soft bristles cleans most of the deck and the smooth fiberglass surfaces, while a core of short, tough fibers rests in the center.
I deploy these stiffer bristles simply by pressing down on the brush when I need the extra scrubbing power.
Combine this brush with a Shurhold 9-foot telescoping aluminum handle (about $38), and you can wash just about every spot on your boat with one tool.
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Emergency Hand Pumps

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Boating safety dictates that you have a means of dewatering your vessel.
That usually means a motorized bilge pump.
However, if the bilge pump fails or drains the battery, you might need to manually dewater the boat.
You can turn to an ordinary bucket to bail water, but buckets don’t fit well into small lockers or crowded bilge compartments.
That’s where a manual pump comes in handy.
The West Marine 36-inch manual bilge pump (about $55) has a narrow tube that fits into any compartment.
It pumps 13 gallons per minute or 780 gallons per hour at a nominal pace.
The lightweight pump and 72-inch hose are easy to stow; you can also use it to pump rainwater from boat covers and compartments.
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Your VHF Antenna While Trailering

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If you’ve ever followed a trailer boat down the highway, you might notice its 8-foot-long VHF antenna flailing about with every bump in the road, even though the antenna is folded down for towing.
Clips are available to help secure these antennae, but my friend Steve Bowcott showed me a relatively simple solution.
He fashioned a ³/16-inch-diameter cord with a loop on the end.
He cinches the loop around the tip of the antenna, then belays the bitter end to a stern cleat.
A slight bend in the fiberglass antenna maintains enough tension to keep it from whipping about wildly under tow.
He removes the cord and tilts the antenna up when he’s ready to launch.
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