Fishing

Blue Marlin Biology

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[A] Eyes: Proportionate to their body size, blue marlin have the largest eyes of any billfish species, comparable to the eyes of a swordfish.
[H] Brain: A huge optic center processes information from the eyes, giving blue marlin excellent vision.
They essentially see in black and white as they look down, but in shades of color as they look up toward the ocean’s surface.
Are there times and locations where large numbers of blue marlin are present but mostly feeding down near the thermocline?
For one thing, blue marlin have the biggest eyes in the billfish family, comparable to the enormous eyes of broadbill swordfish.
It’s interesting that some individuals make large-scale movements, while others might hang around a given area for extended periods of time.
Some blues circulate around the Western Pacific, and others between the Coral Sea off of northeastern Australia to the South Pacific islands.
We targeted school yellowfin, narrow-barred mackerel, and dogtooth tuna from 8 to 50 pounds for both live- and dead-rigged baits, and did not shy away from baits on the larger end of the scale.
We observed big marlin flashing in and attacking whole live tuna, open-mouthed, like predators without bills.
This means a blue marlin would see red as black, and various other colors as perhaps shades of gray.

Chica de Mayo Women’s Flyfishing Event Turns 10

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Each year in May, The River’s Edge and Simms Fishing Products host a women’s flyfishing event in Bozeman, MT—Chica de Mayo.
The gathering has evolved into the largest women’s flyfishing event in Montana, the United States, and well, probably in the world.
This year’s event celebrates women in flyfishing and offers educational clinics, phenomenal female speakers, prizes, a cocktail party, and much more.
It also marks the 10th Annual Chica de Mayo—a labor of love and a true milestone to celebrate.
Over the years guest speakers have presented on Kick Plastic, Aquatic Invasive Species, and other topics.
Throughout the day, merchandise sales and pink bucket raffles raise funds for Casting for Recovery – a non-profit organization offering breast cancer survivors a unique retreat program that combines breast cancer education and peer support with the therapeutic sport of flyfishing.
“From the 2017 event fundraising, a check for $5,000 was presented to Casting for Recovery—double the amount raised in 2016,” said Simms’ Diane Bristol.
“Between this and the continued growth in participation, it indicates that women are not only excited to potentially win an amazing prize, but that they also really want to support other women in flyfishing.” The River’s Edge and Simms Fishing are inviting all women anglers, near and far, to attend this year’s Chica de Mayo.
As the date draws closer, a team of incredible lady anglers are highly motivated to make this year an epic celebration.
Watch The River’s Edge and Simms Fishing Products Instagram and Facebook feeds for updates and to plan your trip to Bozeman to help us celebrate ten years.

Striper Migration Map March 30 2018

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2018 Striper Migration Map The striper migration has begun!
Striped bass are moving toward spawning grounds in Chesapeake Bay tributaries, and smaller stripers are getting active in warming inshore areas in Delaware Bay, along the New Jersey beaches, in the backwaters at the west end of Long Island, and in tidal rivers in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.
Follow along as we track the Striper Migration.
Chesapeake Bay Striper Report On the upper Chesapeake, the water temperature in the Susquehanna Flats has been holding about 45 degrees and rising slowly.
Note that beginning on April 1, the striped bass season is closed on spawning grounds.
Grumpy’s Tackle in Seaside Park reported that small plugs, shads, and bloodworms are all working in the backwaters.
New York Striper Report Backwater areas on the West End of the island were holding some schoolie stripers, and the fish have been a little more active thanks to warming water temperatures.
In Brooklyn at Bernie’s Bait and Tackle, they said anglers are starting to target schoolie striped bass in the area.
In Wantagh at Causeway Bait & Tackle, they reported anglers having great success with schoolie striped bass in the back bays.
Connecticut/Rhode Island Striper Report The holdover striper fishing has been good in the Housatonic River and in Connecticut RIver tributaries, and the fish will only get more active once the water begins to warm.

The Best Hunting Knives for Under $200

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Grohmann makes it in stainless and tool steel.
The tool steel knife is just fine.
Around $100; Grohmann Knives Cold Steel Master Hunter in San Mai Cold Steel makes the most diverse line of cutlery I know of.
On the mundane side, Cold Steel also makes one of the best hunting knives you can lay a paw on, the Master Hunter in San Mai.
The handle is slip-proof and fine to use in cold weather.
Quite literally, a perfect hunting knife, right down to the loss-proof sheath.
Around $160; Coldsteel Ontario Knife Hunt Plus Drop Point There are two versions of this: a drop-point and a skinner.
It’s a 4-inch blade made of hollow-ground, high-carbon stainless, with a rubber handle that is an ergonomic marvel.
The real-world price is only about $40, which makes it an incredible bargain; Ontario Knife Co.
Knives of Alaska Alpha Wolf This is a minimalist masterpiece, designed by Charles Allan, who is a game biologist, a licensed Alaska guide, and has looked into more gut piles than you have glasses of beer.

INDUSTRY NEWS | FISHING

Tarpon Time

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Tarpon Time Florida Sportsman member: syxx I had figured with the warming spell the tarpon would probably show up big today.
Islamorada Tarpon Action Florida Sportsman member: syxx Mackerel fishing was very good early on with lots of decent size fish.
We kept throwing in their direction, and soon Pam hooked and landed a nice 25 pound tarpon!
I was using a variety of cut bait, but once the bull sharks arrived, it was all over I lost a ton of fish and multiple rigs, but just great action every drop kind of day, with some very quality table fare.
Keys Backcountry Fishing Florida Sportsman member: piner_wahoo Senior forum member piner_wahoo and some friends have had two consecutive successful days out in the Florida Keys backcountry.
It was a good day to be on the water!
August in Islamorada Florida Sportsman member: syxx Though my best days this week we landed 9 out of 12 tarpon in two trips, most in the 30 to 60 pound range.
Tarpon Time in the Keys Florida Sportsman member: syxx I’ve been fishing tarpon since the first week of February and we’ve had pretty good early season fishing but now the real big schools are showing up.
The snook are biting good, some days catching 20-plus fish with some big ones mixed in […] Click here to see the full forum report.
[…] Key West Flats Fishing Florida Sportsman member: Capt.

Best Sunglasses for Fishing

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A pair of high-quality polarized sunglasses is mandatory for a truly memorable day on the water.
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Foreground — White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan — Opaque Semi-Opaque Background — White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan — Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window — White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan — Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Costa Del Mar Rincon Named for a world-renowned California surf break, Rincon is a hot new style from Costa that is equally at home on the blue water.
Costas are a favorite among billfish enthusiasts thanks to their incredible optic clarity and durability.
The Mack, shown in black matte frame and blue mirror lens, combines Pelagic’s mineral glass lens technology with its proprietary Zero-Glare polarization and Tuff-Lens scratch protection, all in a frame style that looks great on a wide variety of anglers.
It combines optics that are nearly as crisp as glass with light weight and excellent scratch and shatter resistance.
Big Wave is shown here in a translucent matte-gray rubber frame with blue mirror lens.
Byron Bay, another popular style from Maui Jim shown here in green-stripe rubber frame, is a perfect choice for the boat or the beach.
The Ember, from Smith, shown in a Bleach Marine frame with ChromaPop brown lens, has a subtle ladies cat-eye design, an ultralight frame and performance no-slip nose pads for all-day comfort on the water.
Smith’s ChromaPop lenses enhance clarity and natural color to help define the waters that lie ahead.

Ancient Salmon Were Not Migratory

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Ancient populations of Atlantic Salmon in Lake Ontario were completely landlocked, never venturing to the ocean, according to a recent study from Canadian researchers.
Now-extinct strains of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar) in the easternmost of the Great Lakes apparently had a life cycle that was based entirely in fresh water, contradicting decades of accepted scientific consensus in regards to the migratory behavior of the species, which have a native range from the Upper Atlantic Seaboard to northern Europe and Russia.
The researchers found that the isotopic signatures in the samples from the western Lake Ontario data set showed clear differences from those from the St. Lawrence, indicating long term exposure to either fresh water or marine elements during the fish’s life cycle.
This means that while the St. Lawrence populations were anadromous (running downstream to the ocean to mature), the western fish were entirely potadromous — living their entire lives in fresh water after being spawned in tributary streams, and using the giant lake itself as a maturing ground.
Outside of the incidence of small numbers of relatively stunted “Landlocked Salmon” in New England lakes (probably of introduced origin) this is counter to most perceptions of Atlantic Salmon being uniformly anadromous and requiring access to salt water to support self-sustaining populations.
The cause for the initial demise of Salmo Salar in Lake Ontario is still subject to speculation, despite the application of modern science to the question.
Despite this, modern aquaculture and sporting introductions of species of Pacific salmon into the Great Lakes system — notably Chinook and Steelhead — have been wildly successful, despite those species exhibiting anadromous behaviors in their home range of the Pacific northwest and far eastern Russia.
The Great Lakes have been subject to decades of regulatory directives that have resulted in improved water quality since a low point in the late 1960’s, with the start of the modern environmental movement after the Cuyahoga River near Cleveland caught fire due to hydrocarbon pollution.
It is unknown if the currently established pacific species in the Great Lakes were forcibly adapted to the necessity of landlocked behavior, or if a subset of the introduced population carried a predisposition in the first place.
If so, that knowledge would be crucial for fisheries planning.

Bonefish Breeding in Captivity

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Bonefish have now been observed attempting to reproduce in captivity, a new development in marine fisheries science.
As reported by our friends (and yours) at the Bonefish and Tarpon Trust, schools of Albula Vulpes have been recorded exhibiting spawning behavior in the large aquariums at the Atlantis Resort in Nassau, Bahamas.
Bonefish, a favorite target species for salt water fly rod anglers, have global tropical distribution but are a major focus of an extremely developed and mature sport fishery in the Caribbean ocean.
Fisherman from around the world travel to area resorts and employ local guide services in pursuit of a fish that can sprint at over 50 mph when hooked.
Along with Tarpon and Permit, Bonefish are part of the highly prized “Caribbean Grand Slam”, where anglers catch — and release — a specimen of all three species in a days fishing.
Despite the sporting and economic importance that Bonefish represent to the region, little is known about their reproductive and migratory habits.
One way we’re trying to decipher the riddles of bonefish spawning is through the Bonefish Restoration Research Project, a collaboration with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and Florida Atlantic University’s (FAU) Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, which aims to spawn and rear bonefish in captivity.
This would be supported by anecdotal reports from guides observing pre-spawning schools of several hundred fish staging in the wild for spawning in deep water.
After coordinating with project member organizations, Bonefish Restoration Research Project researchers mounted a collection expedition to the Berry Islands, and working with local guide Percy Darville netted over 200 fish which were transferred to the Atlantis tanks unharmed.
Members and volunteers included Dave Wert (Atlantis Aquarium Director), Todd Kemp (Atlantis Head Collector), Vernel Ching (Atlantis Aquarists), Justin Lewis (BTT Bahamas Initiative Manager), and Nina Sanchez (Bahamian student and BTT research assistant) BTT staff reports, “Our hope is that the bonefish added to the aquarium will help trigger spawning activity in the near future, which will help us gain a better understanding of bonefish spawning behavior.