Fishing

This BC Fishery is on the Brink with Only 250 Spawners Projected for 2018

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With roughly 250 spawners projected for 2018, the fishery is on the brink.
Federation of Fly Fishers, and B.C.
You can help by signing the petition, below.
In the autumn of 2017, while Thompson steelhead returns were estimated at under 200 fish—the lowest return on record—Fisheries and Oceans Canada (“DFO”), the federal department that regulates commercial fishing in Canada, permitted commercial and First Nations gillnet chum salmon fisheries in the Fraser River during peak steelhead migration.
We won’t know the extent of the damage until the spring, when provincial fisheries staff visit the spawning areas to count fish.
We can’t change what happened in 2017.
But we can change 2018 and the years to follow.
We can call on Canada’s federal government to permanently ban gillnets and other non-selective fishing methods in time for the 2018 Thompson steelhead migration.
And we can call on them to work with commercial and First Nations salmon fishers to promote selective salmon fishing and provide funding to support the transition to these methods.
Tell the Canadian government that they must remove gillnets and other non-selective salmon fishing methods that kill Thompson steelhead from British Columbia’s Fraser River and Johnstone Straight during Thompson steelhead migration.

Montana Cutthroat Fly Fishing

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Trees burned nearly 30 years ago in the great Yellowstone fires guided our train of horses into Bull Moose Camp, a congregation of tents situated at the confluence of the three forks of Hellroaring Creek—the same Hellroaring that meanders into Yellowstone National Park a mere eight miles south and eventually joins the Yellowstone River.
Hellroaring Creek proved to be primarily a dry-fly fishery, one where a well-placed fly almost always raised a fish.
According to the National Park Service, “Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) are the most widespread native trout of the park and were the dominant fish species prior to Euroamerican settlement.
Fish & Wildlife Service does not warrant listing the Yellowstone cutthroat trout as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
“Yellowstone Lake and the Yellowstone River together contain the largest inland population of cutthroat trout in the world.
Every clear, pastoral pool seemed to offer up plenty of smaller cutthroat (most fish measured 12 inches or less), while larger fish could occasionally be found tucked in the undercut banks lining the meandering creek.
After a long day of fishing, hiking, and riding, the simple acts of splashing water on your face to get the dust off, digging into a hearty meal, and then sitting around the campfire talking about nothing in particular tended to remind one of the real priorities in life.
Why do we fish, we often ask ourselves?
My final morning in camp, I pulled out a notebook and wrote the following, trying to find a way to capture the place: “There are no moose in Bull Moose Camp.
There are, however, plenty of cowboys, horses, mules, and a curious supply of rather good boxed wine.

Caison 67 Fishing Machine On the Drawing Board

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Donnie Caison continues to define his brand by offering a complete design and build experience: His boats are designed to fish hard by someone with a deep passion for the sport.
Caison’s boats are based on the classically flared cold-molded Carolina hull, yet each build is entirely unique based on the customer’s choice of length, power, electronics and amenities.
With his latest project, a 67-foot sport-fisher, he continues to design and build custom yachts to the exacting specifications of his clients.
This build is for a returning customer, underscoring Caison’s inspirational loyalty to those with whom he works.
“The Caison 67 will maintain my traditional values of no-nonsense fishability, classic lines and modern technology,” he says, “but it’s always exciting to incorporate the customer’s input, and utilize state-of-the-art manufacturing and equipment to produce an incredible sport-fishing boat.” The Caison 67 will be powered by a pair of MTU 2,600-horsepower diesels, which should produce a cruising speed of over 40 knots.
It will also sport a pair of 25-kilowatt generators, a Seakeeper 16 gyrostabilizer and a full tuna tower.
The interior layout will feature a spacious salon, well-appointed galley, four staterooms and three heads.
The Caison 67 is expected to splash in fall 2019.

Where to Find the Fish in December and January

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First choice: Brazil Second choice: Barbados If you’re after a trophy, there’s no better place than Vitoria, Brazil, where the first drop, less than an hour’s run, produces some of the world’s largest white marlin, averaging 90 pounds and some hovering around 150.
While some are caught by boats trolling for wahoo, chumming and chunking frequently produce more tuna.
First choice: Florida Second choice: Louisiana Whether it’s live-baiting the various Islamorada and Marathon humps on the Atlantic side, or chumming and chunking near shrimp boats out in the Gulf, the Florida Keys now offers superb action with blackfins.
First choice: Bahamas Second choice: Cayman Islands As winter weather sets in, the warmer climates of the Bahamas and Cayman Islands keep more bones accessible to anglers.
First choice: Florida Second choice: Costa Rica When the mercury drops, Florida’s linesiders seek milder water temps in deep residential canals, coastal rivers, and bridges over the deeper points of the Intracoastal Waterway.
First choice: Costa Rica Second choice: Florida In Costa Rica, silver kings stage around the mouths of Rio San Juan, Rio Colorado, and other rivers on the Caribbean coast.
First choice: Louisiana Second choice: Florida The running of the bulls continues in southeast Louisiana, where reds often weighing over 30 pounds still feast on schooling baitfish at the mouths of major bays and along outer island shorelines.
In Mexico’s Baja waters, a steady increase in swordfish numbers in the Sea of Cortez coincides with the January full moon, and boats start to find some finning on the surface.
First choice: Florida Second choice: North Carolina Florida’s Gulf coast, from Key West to the Panhandle, teems with kings this time of year.
First choice: Louisiana Second choice: Florida Oil and gas platforms along Louisiana’s coast provide both the forage and the cover speckled trout need in winter.

INDUSTRY NEWS | FISHING

Catching World Records

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Catching a world record — line class, all-tackle weight or all-tackle length — represents the ultimate achievement for countless sport-fishing enthusiasts.
While the All-Tackle category often results from being in the right place at the right time with a healthy dose of luck, the odds of broaching individual Line Class or All-Tackle Length categories are much greater, especially with advance preparation.
Know the Rules The International Game Fish Association, the governing body that sets sport-fishing rules and ethics, maitains strict guidelines record catches on conventional and fly tackle.
IGFA members receive the annual World Record Game Fishes, which lists all existing records along with the rules.
Non-members access the All-Tackle catches via the organization’s web site.
For example, all men’s and women’s fly records for Atlantic halibut are unfilled.
Catch one of these, submit a valid application, and you’re an instant legend.
Record fish don’t have to be killed; Eligible species can be released after they are measured for length.
Of the 20 conventional categories, more than a dozen tripletail records have been set in the Port Canaveral, Florida area between May and October.
Dave Lear is the IGFA representative for North Florida.

Huge Redfish on Fly

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The Key to Bull Redfish on the Fly “The most important thing is finding the fish,” said Yelverton.
“I always have three rigs—all 10 weights—ready to go,” said Yelverton.
“I’ll have one rod with standard floating line and popper or crease fly, another rod with intermediate sink line with a sinking fly, and I’ll have another 10 weight with full sinking line—300 grain or so—and a heavier, faster sinking fly.” Fly selection for these inshore bull reds is really pretty simple.
Big poppers—size 2/0 or 3/0—work very well when the reds are crushing bait on top, and sometimes, a loud “pop” from a big popper will pull reds to the surface from deeper water.
Yelverton recommends that big Crease flies are easier for the bull reds to get into their mouths.
“When the fish are on the surface, you’ll see them and run over,” said Yelverton.
“You may have to let the fly sink down 25 feet or more.
You’ll be amazed at how many bull reds you’ll catch doing this.” Don’t Forget the Beach Although most bull red fly anglers fish from boats, it is entirely possible to find and catch these golden bruisers off the sand.
When the reds are in the Gulf, they’ll often chase bait inside the first bar, and this puts them in range of fly anglers.
The same flies that catch them in the big bays and passes will work on beach reds.

Hand-Crank Deep-Drop for Tilefish

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Rig Basics For example, with the 130-pound mono she prefers for trophy goldens, there are no well-manicured, crimped connections.
At the opposite end of the main leader is a 175-pound-test crane swivel attached to a 200-pound-test snap swivel on the fishing line.
130-Pound Three-Way Swivel 8.)
Sinker, Girth Hitched to Loop To minimize tangle risks when dropping to depths approaching 1,000 feet, the section of mono from the crane swivel to the first 130-pound, three-way swivel is 16 to 18 inches long.
The section between this upper three-way swivel and the lower three-way swivel is 21 to 24 inches.
And there’s approximately 15 inches between the lower swivel and sinker.
The prominent use of swivels counters the line twist from dropping and retrieving, drifting and the current; the fishing line and terminal rig must lie perfectly straight as they soak on the bottom.
The strands are between 12 and 16 inches long from bottom to top, respectively, and 6/0 circle hooks get the nod.
Deep Strategy On bottom, Synowiec insists on staying in contact with the mud and feeling the weight drag across it.
“The rig must stay on the bottom long enough to slide across a colony of goldens and for the light and bait scent to interest them.

Aqua-Vu’s Ten Inch Screen is Here

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Aqua-Vu HDi Underwater Cameras set gold standards in clarity, versatility & low light viewing Ice fishing leader Brian “Bro” Brosdahl sees things just a little differently.
But if you ask Bro himself, he’ll tell you absolutely, what he sees below the ice and how he views the fish themselves makes all the difference in the world.
“Through the big beautiful HD screen, my clients and I had so much fun watching perch, big bluegills, walleyes and everything else swimming down below.
Each new Aqua-Vu — HD10i Pro, HD10i, HD7i Pro and HD7i — features an advanced, reconfigured XD Camera Housing.
I’ve never seen a camera capable of clarifying those conditions.” Connected to a 7- or 10-inch color LCD, these high definition camera systems include 75 or 125 feet of rugged cable and integrated, adjustable infrared lighting.
The new XD Camera Housing allows for instant fin and accessory changes.
“But these HD systems take things underwater to whole new levels of awesome.
How can you beat that?” Available at major outdoor retailers in early winter, the new Aqua-Vu HDi Underwater Viewing Systems come with everything you need to find and study the fish you seek — all in spectacular HD color and clarity.
Inventive ice angler and guide Brian Brosdahl says anglers can learn a lot by watching fish bite on the HD screen.
Creator of Aqua-Vu, the original Underwater Viewing System, Outdoors Insight, Inc. has led the underwater camera category in design, innovation and quality since 1997.