Hunting

The Women’s Gun Show “Low Light to No Light Training”

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On this week’s show, Barbara Baird will talk to the firearms trainer Mike Ross, about how to train for low light to no light shooting.
Carrie Lightfoot joins Barbara to discuss cool products and what’s happening now in the world of shooting.
Julie Golob weighs in with her Tip Time, The show’s sponsors include Ruger and NRA Women.
Topic: Low Light to No Light Training NRA trainer Mike Ross, who also is former law enforcement and Marine Corps MP, talks to Barb about the importance of training in the dark.
Also, Ross, who is the lead instructor at Rough Country Outdoors Shooting Range, Missouri, is the lead instructor for The Well Armed Woman chapter there.
Tip Time with Julie Golob: Sponsored by NRA Women.
Carrie found a Streamlight TLR 2 for your gun.
tactical light for low light shooting drills.
($61.45) TWAW Product of the Week – TASER STRIKELIGHT Carrie thinks this Taser/flashlight combo is the bomb, but only if your state allows such a weapon.
Download, listen and subscribe to The Women’s Gun Show on iTunes, Stitcher and iHeart Radio.

Big Buck Dreams from the Big Buck Dreamlands

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Dream on!
I’m talking big buck dreams from the big buck dreamlands in our dreamy little deerhunting heads!
And it goes like this… I hunt hard every day.
So as always, just before hitting the sack in my little Michigan swamp log cabin, I go to the front door and switch on the big floodlights and have a look at what might be in the cabin foodplot.
I tell Toby how since the buck is on the high ground by the cabin at 9:30 at night, that maybe, just maybe, he will cruise the north marsh ridgeline looking for stinky does through the night, and maybe, just maybe if I walk the mile west before dawn and get in the new ladderstand, maybe, just maybe, I can ambush the 8-pointer in the morning.
What a hunt!
What a buck!
What a dream!
From Deer & Deer Hunting magazine, the 2017 Whitetails Calendar is your top deer hunting resource!
Whether in print or digital format, use this deer moon phase calendar to find out which days the deer will be seeking and chasing, so you can time the rut for the best time to hunt.

How to Make a Shotgun Shell Lighted Wreath

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When she was a little girl, we always made crafty things at Christmas.
Often, her brothers would participate.
The list included homemade bread dough ornaments, stitchery projects, flax bags and of course, kitchen creations – buckets and Tupperware containers full of cookies and candies for all to enjoy.
Except, I wanted it to have some greenery in it.
It was a fun project, and took us about 2 hours total.
Materials: Three-foot wide, fake green wreath with lights (K-Mart, on sale for $34) Strand of 100 clear lights ($4) Shotgun shells in assorted sizes and colors (free from local range) Glue gun and sticks Bow ($4) One bottle Chardonnay (for the wreath makers) Directions: Lay out a proper staging area for your wreath making.
We used the basement floor and spread old dog food bags down to catch the drippy glue.
Open the bottle of wine.
Start at opposite ends of the light strand and put a touch of glue on the plastic part, not the light bulb.
Celebrate and enjoy the festive wreath made from recycled shot shells.

How To Create a Precise Rest Setup for Improved Bowhunting Accuracy

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Of all the moving parts of a bow and arrow outfit setting up and tuning an arrow rest is trickiest.
Before you begin always read the instructions for your rest.
Center-Shot Center-shot refers to launcher arms positioned so a nocked arrow viewed from behind, sighting along the cam flats, rides straight behind the bowstring.
If done carefully this is often good enough to start, but I take an extra step to assure perfection.
Attach a laser center-shot tool, nock an arrow and align the laser with the nocking point/serving center.
Correlating Nocking Point A simple T-square nocking-point tool is then used to assure your D-loop or nocking point is positioned properly.
Generally, release aids allow a dead-zero to 1/8-inch high nocking point, while finger shooters might position nocking points up to ¼-inch high due to the added pressure of two fingers under, one over.
To fine tune use a bow vice plus bow and arrow level set, as launcher fork depth and arrow diameter can affect how precise readings are with primitive T-square tools.
Correct by choosing a stiffer (or shorter) arrow, reducing draw weight, reducing point weight or adjusting launcher windage inward (toward riser).
High or low tears are an indication of an improperly positioned nocking point, corrected by moving nocking point in the opposite direction of the tear; lower for high tears, higher for low.

INDUSTRY NEWS | HUNTING

Short Barrels for Brush

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“No one ever wishes they bought a gun with a shorter barrel.” That’s my usual advice when people ask which barrel length they should choose.
It’s rarely those last 2 inches of barrel that cause the problem.
You could argue then that a gun cut down to the legal minimum would be the best choice.
If you want to take that argument to the absurd extreme, a Taurus Judge .410 revolver becomes the ideal grouse gun.
My SKB 100 with 25 inch barrels was a very compact gun, but I couldn’t hit anything but a straightaway woodcock with it.
Personally I’d rather hunt with a gun I know I can hit with and take my chances with the brush.
I put the barrel length question to him.
He said “Funny you should ask.
My normal grouse gun has 26-inch barrels, but I took my 28-inch o/u into the woods last time.
The longer the barrel, the more branches it hits.

Lessons From The 2016 Rut

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Last fall’s rut was one of the most frustrating of any in the 56 years I’ve hunted.
But overall, it wasn’t a good year for antler growth, and even during the rut daytime buck movement seemed lower than usual.
Although there’s always more to learn, we’ve managed to dig out many of the factors that make whitetails do what they do.
Light is what signals a special part of the brain that regulates hormonal activity.
Which full moon is determined genetically; Midwestern deer tend to breed on the November full moon, while deer in South Texas and northern Mexico cue on the December full moon.
Day length is tied to the calendar, of course, but the timing of the full moon in any month varies from year to year.
Last year’s three super moons were on Oct. 16, Nov. 14 and Dec. 14.
And finally, the brain must be primed to start the reproductive cycle.
* Lunar timing — a “blue” moon and three “super moons” — greatly impacted the rut.
* Climatic conditions affected the availability and quality of deer foods during the growing season.

New Controversial South Carolina Deer Regs

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South Carolina had been the last holdout against a statewide season bag limit on whitetail bucks.
But many hunters and landowners have expressed interest in growing more mature bucks.
A legislative bill signed into law by Gov.
Nikki Haley has the wheels turning in that direction.
“There’s been a good bit of history on these changes,” SCDNR Big Game Program Coordinator Charles Ruth said in a Facebook Live event to explain them to the public.
in fact, we’d had two-thirds of the state that’s never had any kind of bag limit on a daily or seasonal basis on antlered bucks.
The state is at the forefront of research on these predators, and SCDNR data indicate they’re causing high fawn mortality that’s significantly impacted the number of deer available.
Put it all together, and many hunters, deer biologists and legislators agree it’s time to reduce the buck harvest and keep closer tabs on what’s being shot over the course of the season.
Due to the sweeping nature of these changes, hunters are strongly advised to read the regulations before heading afield.
(Deer tags were being mailed to license holders as this issue went to press.)

Understand Point of Impact to Hit More Birds

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A shotgun’s point of impact, or POI, is measured as a ratio of the percentage of shot that rises above the line of sight when the gun is mounted to the percentage of the shot charge that remains below the line of sight.
Trap guns usually shoot 70/30, so the bulk of your shot string impacts above the rib, which makes sense in a discipline where virtually every target is climbing away from the shooter.
In most cases, you don’t really need to count pellets—a 30-inch circle target with a dot in the middle will immediately give you an idea of where you are patterning without counting each and every hole.
Altering POI Some new shotguns come with shims that can change POI, or you might have a target model that has an adjustable comb or rib that allows you to transfer your point of impact.
Shims also allow you to adjust cast if you are shooting to the left or right.
But even if you don’t have a shotgun with shims, there are options.
If you’re trying to lower the POI, you’ll need to either lower the comb or raise the front bead.
Experienced gunsmiths can rehead the stock, adjusting the angle at which the stock meets the action, or bend a wooden stock.
They allow toe-on, toe-off alterations to make shooting more comfortable.
This causes POI to shift in the direction of the honing.