Ice Fishing Rod Holder Tip Up

One of my favorite “two-fors” is the HT Ice Rigger, a dead-stick system combining an adjustable rod holder with a classic tip-up-style signal flag. Place your rod-reel combo in the holder, set the reel to free spool, and position your line within the trip. When a fish strikes, the trip bar rises, releasing the flag just as your line slips from the clip and begins flowing off the spool. Simply lift your combo, and when the timing is right, set the hook. When you’re done fishing, free one end of the trip bar from an eyelet, slide the flag wire underneath, then reposition the bar. Another clever 2-in-1 is HT’s Little Jigger Tip Down. This tip-down works like any other, but rather than revealing strikes by simply tipping down and requiring the user to bring in fish hand-over-hand, it also accommodates spinning combos, so when a fish strikes, just raise your combo, set the hook, and fight the fish. Once set, the wind does all the work. Use varied bobbing motions to attain a wide spectrum of increasingly aggressive jigging motions. When fish are biting lightly you see irregular movements in the established motion.
Rod Holder Tip Up

Some of the most versatile systems in fishing have been 2-in-1 designs combining multiple functions. One of my favorite “two-fors” is the HT Ice Rigger, a dead-stick system combining an adjustable rod holder with a classic tip-up-style signal flag. There’s no automatic hook-set mechanism or automated jigging motion so it’s legal everywhere.
Place your rod-reel combo in the holder, set the reel to free spool, and position your line within the trip. When a fish strikes, the trip bar rises, releasing the flag just as your line slips from the clip and begins flowing off the spool. Simply lift your combo, and when the timing is right, set the hook.

Rod Holder Tip Up

The Ice Rigger features two flag-post location options and a two-sided trip bar to accommodate reels with right- or left-hand retrieves, and the trip-clip grips now have a slicker coating, creating smoother releases. Tight fitting “drag” rings are positioned on the trip bar, too. Slid against the outer brackets, they permit adjustable trip tension to suit your presentation and the activity level of fish. When more tension is necessary, you can position your line deeper in the trip and more vertically to increase surface area between line and clip.

Running your line from a rod guide down to the trip—as opposed to directly from the reel spool—provides the best trip angle. For lighter trips, use slick braided line and position line more horizontally nearer the edge of the trip clip. Spraying a shot of Ice Stopper liquid, Reel…

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