Outdoor

President Trump Plans to Shrink Bears Ears by 1.1 Million Acres

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According to a draft document obtained by Outside, President Donald Trump on Monday plans to gut Bears Ears National Monument, the first such area to be co-managed by native tribes, reducing it from 1.35 million acres to 201,397 acres.
“Those numbers match what you’ve been hearing out of Utah,” says Peter Metcalf, former president of Utah-based Black Diamond Equipment and a longtime public lands advocate.
Ms. Landreth added: “They’re bluffing.
Bears Ears National Monument will become two new monuments, Indian Creek National Monument and Shásh Jaa’ National Monument.
(Shásh Jaa’ is Navajo for “bears ears.”) Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument will in turn become three monuments: Grand Staircase National Monument, Kaiparowits National Monument, and Escalante Canyons National Monument, together comprising 997,490 acres.
Trump’s announcement comes after months of speculation about the future of Bears Ears.
Republican Congressman Rob Bishop, for example, has spent much of his career trying to gut the Antiquities Act, which presidents since Teddy Roosevelt have used to protect lands without Congressional approval.
Other members of the Utah delegation, including Governor Herbert and Senator Orrin Hatch, have also been eager to reduce the size of the monuments.
Along with NARF, the Navajo Nation, Patagonia, and a host of environmental groups plan to file suit arguing that President Trump doesn’t have the authority to so drastically resize Bears Ears.
“If this leaked document is true, the Administration’s unlawful actions betray our shared responsibility to protect iconic places for future generations.

9 Apps to Make Your Travel Easy

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Book zilch ahead of time.
Now, thanks to a heap of smart travel apps and websites, you can spend less time planning and researching and more time actually getting the most out of your trip.
Best of all, you can download 3D maps for when you’re out of cell range.
Bonus: It’ll also help you find the cheapest gas on the road.
Avalanche Forecasts (Free) Pro skier Elyse Sausgstad recommends Avalanche Forecasts, which connects to every avalanche center on the West Coast of North America.
Dayuse (Free) There might be a lot of reasons you’d need a high-end hotel room for just a couple hours while traveling: to score a gym workout and a shower during a camping road trip, take a nap after an overnight flight, or use the Wi-Fi for a quiet private office in the middle of the day.
With Dayuse, you can book a room at more than 3,000 hotels around the world from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at prices up to 75 percent off the regular rate.
Gociety (Free) In a new place and need a climbing or skiing partner?
Gaia GPS ($30) “On any backcountry adventure, I always have my iPhone with downloaded USGS topographic maps on the Gaia GPS app,” says ultrarunner Jeff Browning.
Hopper (Free) Tell Hopper where in the world you want to go, and it’ll tell you the cheapest airfare available, predict whether the fare is likely to rise or fall, and notify you when your desired flight drops in price.

An Inside Look at a Winter Expedition

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“The winter for me is a place of wonderful extremes in which I have always found peace and quiet in the snow covered mountains.” To get a better idea of the ins and outs of the Colorado Backcountry Skiing and Snowboarding course, I contacted Chris, as well as Ty, who are both seasoned winter Instructors for Outward Bound’s skiing and snowboarding expeditions in the Colorado Rockies.
Both are passionate, powder-hungry skiers and snowboarders who have instructed many winter courses in Colorado.
There are many Outward Bound courses that involve snow, but there is no other course that devotes more time to skiing and riding than the Colorado Backcountry Skiing and Snowboarding expedition.
Chris adds that one of his favorite things about instructing this course is watching students who have never skied powder before get a taste of what it’s like.
Chris and Ty both agree that the best part of camping in snow is getting to build the coolest living arrangements.
Ty’s favorite moment with students was on a course during New Year’s Eve.
“What I see students taking away from these winter courses is a new found layer to what they can achieve,” says Chris.
I believe life is all about embracing challenges and new experiences.
I have found few experiences that are as challenging and simultaneously rewarding as a winter Outward Bound course.
That’s why Chris and Ty come back year after year as Instructors.

INDUSTRY NEWS | OUTDOOR

Kayak Camping Pancakes

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Ingredients will be crammed in a bulkhead compartment that may be wet at times, fresh foods tend to get squished, and you’re bound to want fast calories after long days on the water.
Making delicious meals is manageable, though.
A Few Freshies Go A Long Way While you might be used to packing freeze-dried meals for the backcountry, keep in mind that when you’re packing for a kayaking trip, a few fresh ingredients can go a long way toward making meals tasty, satisfying and healthy.
When you’re planning your menu, look for recipe ingredients that are durable, travel well and don’t need to be refrigerated: fresh garlic, an onion or two, maybe some ginger root or a sweet potato.
Incorporate Foraged Foods In many places around the world, this is one the joys of paddling trips: You’re surrounded by delicious food.
Try this easy crowd-pleasing twist to turn a favorite breakfast food into a satisfying anytime meal.
Savory Pancakes for Indian Curry Makes 4 servings Total time: 15 minutes Ingredients: 2 cups instant powdered pancake mix (the kind that only requires adding water) Garlic (fresh, freeze-dried or powdered) Onion (fresh, freeze-dried or powdered) Chives (fresh, freeze-dried or powdered) Salt and pepper Oil, butter or cooking spray Optional: Spicy dish to pair with pancakes, like a freeze-dried curry Directions: Fire up your camping stove.
(Bonus: If you have any other savory vegetables, feel free to add them too—these pancakes would be great with finely chopped and sautéed carrots, sweet potatoes, broccoli, etc.)
Spoon the batter into the pan to form pancakes that are roughly 2 inches in diameter.
Ideally, these savory pancakes are best paired with a spicy dish like the GOOD TO-GO Indian Vegetable Korma or the Backpacker’s Pantry Kathmandu Curry.

Sleep Warmer While Winter Camping

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1) Insulate inside.
Use an inflatable pad to keep you off the cold ground, and layer foam on top to keep body heat close.
Clumpy insulation leaves cold spots.
Once in, shake your legs to evenly redistribute down.
Warm body and cold toes?
Fill a non-insulated bottle with boiling water, seal tightly, encase in a sock, and place in the bottom of your bag to keep feet warm.
Minimize the space you need to heat.
Bag too long?
Do sit-ups to warm up your bag pre-shut-eye.
Insulate by piling dry leaves or pine branches under your tent.

Down Jackets for Winter Adventures

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Higher-quality down lofts to a higher volume, so 800-fill power will insulate better for the same weight than 600-fill power.
The fill weight is how much total down is used in the garment.
We’ve listed the specs for the men’s hooded version.
Insider Tip: Heading somewhere wet?
The right shell fabric can also help protect the down.
Fill: 850-fill-power goose down certified to the RDS Shell Fabric: Pertex® ripstop nylon Best For: High-quality construction and design at a reasonable price This jacket has a pretty great resume—from high-lofted down to a sub-9-ounce weight (for women’s; men’s is 10.8 oz.
On many jackets, the amount of insulation varies based on location of the baffle—i.e., we need more warmth around our core than our lower arms.
Fill: PrimaLoft Gold Insulation Eco Shell Fabric: Recycled polyester ripstop, DWR finish Best For: Shoulder-season outerwear, versatile winter mid layer Yes, we know this isn’t down insulation.
The Nano Puff is a versatile insulating layer that works as a shoulder-season belay jacket, a winter hiking insulator, a ski touring layer, and anything in between.
Insider Tip: Synthetic insulation is becoming increasingly comparable to down.

The River Keeper

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Colorado River guide, photographer, and biologist Amy Martin will always call the Grand Canyon home There’s a mesmerizing quality to Amy Martin’s photographs that can be hard to describe—an interplay of angles, intensity, and light that imbue the canyon with a honeyed glow that makes it feel warm and inviting.
The viewer is sometimes behind an oar, peering downriver, or in a raft, watching the river reflect on the canyon walls.
One eye-level shot of the river’s emerald green waters is so evocative you can almost feel the cool breeze rising off the water.
The Flagstaff resident continues to work the river, rowing National Park Service science and educational trips, volunteering for the nonprofit Grand Canyon Youth, and guiding three to six other trips per year.
She also photographs for the nonprofit American Rivers, advocates for migrant workers, and does environmental justice work on the Navajo Nation.
Taking pictures, of course, wherever she goes.
Her favorite place to take pictures, and the source of her creative inspiration, is Northern Arizona.
“The canyons here are like no other,” says Martin.
Like Martin, she sees an immense opportunity to connect people to nature through guiding and art.
“As an Arizona native, I have lived with the paradox of water and desert for as long as I can remember,” she says.

How to Survive a Zombie Attack

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On this week’s show, Barbara Baird will talk to the podcaster’s producer and Zombie expert, Kenn Blanchard, about how to survive a zombie attack.
Carrie Lightfoot joins Barbara to discuss cool products, more zombie tips and other survival information, sponsored by Ruger.
Julie Golob weighs in with her Tip Time portion of the show, which is sponsored by NRA Women.
Topic: How to Survive a Zombie Attack Phone: 240-623-7200 Buy the book, Zombie Strike, by Kenn Blanchard and Derek Ward.
(Kindle, $7) Cool Products Barb has used these Birchwood Casey targets at a local zombie shoot and highly recommends them, especially for their halo rings after impact.
(Price varies — $8 and up) TWAW Product of the Week Zombie Green Gear!
Carrie says what better than zombie green for your holsters for firearms wear?
WON’s post of the week: Survival Lessons from the Walking Dead Barb mentions the “featured blogger” section of The WON has something from The Survival Mom about lessons from “The Walking Dead.” Download, listen and subscribe to The Women’s Gun Show on iTunes, Stitcher and iHeart Radio.

Hot coffee anywhere you go

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Invest in one of these mugs and banish the mess for good.
Perfect for a dawn-patrol cup of joe, the Rambler 20-ounce tumbler is as comfortable on the road as it is in your pack, with double-vacuum walls that keep your beverages hot or cold for hours on end.
Contigo Autoseal West Loop ($15) For fifteen bucks, the Contigo Autoseal West Loop is the ultimate bargain mug, but don’t let the price tag fool you.
Featuring the company’s Autoseal lid, this mug keeps your gear, car, and pants dry when road conditions deteriorate.
The Mighty Mug Biggie SS ($25) If you’ve ever left a cup of coffee on top of the car, this baby is for you.
The Mighty Mug’s Smartgrip technology creates an airlock to secure the drink carrier to any flat surface, making it all but untippable.
Additionally, the mug’s double-walled, vacuum-insulated construction keeps your coffee piping hot and ready to go, no matter where you leave it.
Chantal Single-Serve Easy Travel Mug ($21) Designed to fit perfectly under most single-serve coffee makers, the Chantal Single-Serve Easy Travel Mug is about as close to grab-and-go as you can get.
A simple push button allows you to drink from any side of the mug, so you can keep your eyes on the road instead of searching for your next sip.
Heat resistant borosilicate glass keeps your hands from burning up, and the bottle’s double lining will maintain tea temperature for at least an hour.