Hunting

Have You Got What It Takes To Hunt A Bighorn?

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In Act One, a correspondent of mine emailed that he was going to take the trip of a lifetime, a sheep hunt this coming fall.
The problem is, he’s 71, and carrying a lot of weight.
Get your deposit back if you can, but don’t go.
You’ll either die, or have such a wretched time trying to keep up that it will be a nightmare instead of a dream hunt.
So, if you show up overweight and short of breath, or unable to sit a saddle, or unable to hunt from can to can’t, there’s going to be no mercy.
On top of this, the outfitter may assign you a 20-year-old guide who’s made of whalebone and auto leaf springs.
These people do not get cramps in their legs, have worn-out knees that torment them with every step, or see stars from lack of oxygen at 10,000 feet, and they can’t imagine that you do.
I sent off the e-mail and there was a long silence.
Finally, came Act Two, in which my correspondent said that he had hunted with this outfitter, and the man had said that if he could lose 30 pounds, he could get him to a sheep.
Oh ho, wrote I, that’s an entirely different kettle of fish.

The Women’s Gun Show “Low Light to No Light Training”

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On this week’s show, Barbara Baird will talk to the firearms trainer Mike Ross, about how to train for low light to no light shooting.
Carrie Lightfoot joins Barbara to discuss cool products and what’s happening now in the world of shooting.
Julie Golob weighs in with her Tip Time, The show’s sponsors include Ruger and NRA Women.
Topic: Low Light to No Light Training NRA trainer Mike Ross, who also is former law enforcement and Marine Corps MP, talks to Barb about the importance of training in the dark.
Also, Ross, who is the lead instructor at Rough Country Outdoors Shooting Range, Missouri, is the lead instructor for The Well Armed Woman chapter there.
Tip Time with Julie Golob: Sponsored by NRA Women.
Carrie found a Streamlight TLR 2 for your gun.
tactical light for low light shooting drills.
($61.45) TWAW Product of the Week – TASER STRIKELIGHT Carrie thinks this Taser/flashlight combo is the bomb, but only if your state allows such a weapon.
Download, listen and subscribe to The Women’s Gun Show on iTunes, Stitcher and iHeart Radio.

Big Buck Dreams from the Big Buck Dreamlands

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Dream on!
I’m talking big buck dreams from the big buck dreamlands in our dreamy little deerhunting heads!
And it goes like this… I hunt hard every day.
So as always, just before hitting the sack in my little Michigan swamp log cabin, I go to the front door and switch on the big floodlights and have a look at what might be in the cabin foodplot.
I tell Toby how since the buck is on the high ground by the cabin at 9:30 at night, that maybe, just maybe, he will cruise the north marsh ridgeline looking for stinky does through the night, and maybe, just maybe if I walk the mile west before dawn and get in the new ladderstand, maybe, just maybe, I can ambush the 8-pointer in the morning.
What a hunt!
What a buck!
What a dream!
From Deer & Deer Hunting magazine, the 2017 Whitetails Calendar is your top deer hunting resource!
Whether in print or digital format, use this deer moon phase calendar to find out which days the deer will be seeking and chasing, so you can time the rut for the best time to hunt.

How to Make a Shotgun Shell Lighted Wreath

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When she was a little girl, we always made crafty things at Christmas.
Often, her brothers would participate.
The list included homemade bread dough ornaments, stitchery projects, flax bags and of course, kitchen creations – buckets and Tupperware containers full of cookies and candies for all to enjoy.
Except, I wanted it to have some greenery in it.
It was a fun project, and took us about 2 hours total.
Materials: Three-foot wide, fake green wreath with lights (K-Mart, on sale for $34) Strand of 100 clear lights ($4) Shotgun shells in assorted sizes and colors (free from local range) Glue gun and sticks Bow ($4) One bottle Chardonnay (for the wreath makers) Directions: Lay out a proper staging area for your wreath making.
We used the basement floor and spread old dog food bags down to catch the drippy glue.
Open the bottle of wine.
Start at opposite ends of the light strand and put a touch of glue on the plastic part, not the light bulb.
Celebrate and enjoy the festive wreath made from recycled shot shells.

INDUSTRY NEWS | HUNTING

The Cast Iron Skillet

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A Dutch oven might get some votes.
From quick-searing thin and delicate strips of tenderloin for one minute to simmering a tough flank steak all afternoon, or from building a hearty pan stew for a hot meal on a cold winter’s evening to browning ground venison for taco meat or spaghetti sauce, and almost every imaginable use in-between, a cast iron skillet truly is the one venison cooking tool every home chef must have in his or her kitchen.
A thick base and walls work to distribute heat better, eliminate hotspots and hold heat longer.
Cast iron skillets have been used for decades by 5-star chefs and home cooks to make great meals.
A cast iron skillet is easy to take care of.
* While the skillet is still hot, dry it with a clean, lint-free towel.
You need to clean and season a skillet after every cooking session.
* Set the clean, seasoned pan in a warm place (perhaps the stovetop) to air dry completely before putting it away.
A cast-iron skillet heats them up just fine and provides good flavor from the browning process.
Skillet Stew: Brown coat venison chunks in some oil, add can of beer and cans of diced and/or stewed tomatoes, and simmer for a few hours.

7 Killer Bowhunting Tactics

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Every time my wife, Nicole, and I set up a stand in a tree or on the ground, we look for ways to make that location the best it can be.
We try to enhance each stand location by making sure there are one or more calling cards available to deer.
A calling card can be natural or man-made, visual or airborne — such as scent.
Licking Branches and Scrapes: Natural and Manufactured Deer have a fascination with licking branches.
So whenever I set up a new tree stand in a promising location, I don’t trim overhanging branches that might become potential licking branches.
If there isn’t a licking branch close by, I’ll manufacture one.
I’ll hang the limb about 4 feet off the ground so it will attract the next deer that comes along.
Sometimes, I’ll break a small limb off the licking branch, mangle it slightly and then place it in the scrape.
Licking branches and scrapes are perfectly natural to deer.
I’ll make sure one of the branches is hanging down so it looks like a licking branch.

Southern Whitetail Deer Rut

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For many deer hunters, patterning a mature buck is dramatically easier the earlier or later in the season they hunt, when bucks tend to be on a bed-to-food schedule.
But add in the complexities of the Southern rut, and you have to wonder: Is it even possible to pattern a buck during this time of year?
In the case of the Southern rut, it’s all about timing.
As does approach estrus they send their button bucks packing, and with increasing pressure from bucks, doe fawns often end up on their own, too.
The more likely cause of the fawns’ new independence is that a buck has pushed them away from the doe because she’s approaching, or is in, estrus.
There is only so much a buck can do to breed as many does as possible.
You can encounter rutting activity from the beginning to the end of the Georgia deer season.
On the coast, rutting activity can begin as early as September, whereas other areas might not see activity until January.
Peak Rut Predictions Southeast South Carolina (Coast): October 18-30 Northwest South Carolina (Blue Ridge Mountains): November 9-22 South Carolina (Piedmont): November 2-18 Source: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources
Like many whitetail states, November is the month to hunt deer in Tennessee if you want to catch peak rutting activity.

Mallards in Flooded Timber

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Somehow, the sight of ducks working over a timber hole draws more ducks from everywhere.
The rest of the ducks make one more circle, but higher and looser.
Jumping the two drakes, Kearns and I each shoot one.
While we wish the rest had come in, the sight of these two in the trees, hanging over the decoys and lit by the morning sun, makes Kearns an instant convert to woods hunting.
Good hunters are secretive.
Where he wants to be, and where he don’t mind goin’.” This is a don’t-mind-goin’ spot, hence, the need for decoys and spinners.
With two dozen decoys in the hole and four spinners going, we’re looking good.
Decoys show up, spinners flash, and the sun creates shadows that make it easy to hide beside a tree.
Often in timber hunting, you don’t see the ducks you’re calling or decoying until after they have seen you.
Timber hunting means standing in the water, so good waders are essential, especially when it’s cold.